95 years of building a stronger Miami

95 years of building a stronger Miami 2019-10-17T11:14:49-05:00

Throughout our 95-year history – from the Miami Community Chest to the United Fund to today’s United Way of Miami-Dade – we have been an enduring force for good, embracing an ever-changing community, responding to the emerging needs and transforming people’s lives.

1991

1991

United Way creates a local Tocqueville Society to recognize and encourage individual giving of $10,000 or more.

With six of Miami’s top 10 employers in bankruptcy, United Way partners with the State of Florida to create the Florida Dislocated Worker’s Center to help the newly employed. Today, this one-stop center is the model for the state.

1986

1986

United Way created a “Response Pool” to provide funding for innovative solutions to some of the community’s most pressing needs of the time. Over the next four years, we invest $3.7 million in programs to reduce gang violence and teen suicide, help farmworker families and migrant students, provide AIDS education and create the first Alzheimer’s Day Care centers.

United Way forms the “New Generation Leaders” committee, known today as the Young Leaders, to engage and inspire young professionals to get involved.

1984

1984

Ad agencies Beber Silverstein and Zubi team up to produce United Way’s first bilingual advertising campaign. Among the taglines created were: “United we’re on our way” and “Hoy por mi, mañana por ti.”

1981

1981

United Way fails to meet its goal in the midst of a sluggish economy. United Way joins with city and community leaders to address increasing drug-related violence, as well as provided medical, housing and other services to recently arrived Cuban and Haitians refugees.

1979

1979

The decade draws to a close and United Way celebrates as giving exceeds $10 million.

1977

1977

Jackie Gleason of The Honeymooners with Eastern Airlines staff help United Way kick off the campaign.

1974

1974

United Way works with lawmakers to devise a new system of distributing resources to South Florida’s elderly population.

1973

1973

The National Football Leagues and United Way nationally team up to create the longest-running public service advertising campaign. Don Shula, Miami Dolphins’ head coach at the time, appears in one of the early ads.

1972

1972

United Fund becomes United Way of Miami-Dade. Alvah H. Chapman, Jr., Miami Herald, led United Way’s first campaign, which raises $6,678,000 to support 46 agencies.

1971

1971

United Fund creates a comprehensive plan to coordinate and evaluate public anti-drug programs in Dade County.